An analysis of the hospitals of Sultan Suleyman and Hurrem: Two different approaches to healthcare in sixteenth-century Ottoman Empire

TitleAn analysis of the hospitals of Sultan Suleyman and Hurrem: Two different approaches to healthcare in sixteenth-century Ottoman Empire
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsKayaalp P
JournalJournal of medical biography
Pagination0967772016681894
KeywordsBayezid, Edirne, Haseki mosque complex, history of science, hospital, Hurrem Sultan, istanbul, Suleyman the Magnificent, Suleymaniye Mosque Complex
Abstract

This study concentrates on two monumental Ottoman pious endowments, each with a major component devoted to healing. The first is the hospital of the Haseki Mosque Complex built by the wife of Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent. An examination of the deed and the modus operandi of this endowment will impart a sense of the role that women of the ruling class played in Ottoman society as builders and healers in the sixteenth century. The analysis of the Haseki Hospital will be followed by an examination of the hospital that is part of the Suleymaniye Mosque Complex built by Sultan Suleyman. The differences between the two perspectives in the promotion of public health will be emphasized, arguing that the Sultan’s approach to healthcare was academic and research-oriented, whereas his wife’s was holistic and devoted to rehabilitation. The endowment deeds and the physical layouts of the two hospitals shed light upon a dual approach to healthcare with gender-specific roles affirmed and shaped by Hurrem and Suleyman the Magnificent, who each built hospitals of their own in Istanbul, the Ottoman capital city.

URLhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0967772016681894
DOI10.1177/0967772016681894