Healthcare architecture on the Silk Road: darüşşi̇fas built by the Seljuk and Ottoman Empires on the Anatolian trade routes

TitleHealthcare architecture on the Silk Road: darüşşi̇fas built by the Seljuk and Ottoman Empires on the Anatolian trade routes
Publication TypeConference Proceedings
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsTanriover S
Conference NameArchi-Cultural Interactions through the Silk Road
PublisherMukogawa Women's University
Conference LocationNishinomiya
KeywordsAnatolia, Bayezid, Darüşşifa, Edirne, healing, healing spaces, healthcare, hospital, Silk Road
Abstract

"The Silk Road" is an extensive intercontinental network of trade routes across the Asian
continent connecting East, South, and Western Asia with the Mediterranean world, as well as
North and Northeast Africa and Europe. This route served as the primary path of commerce
for the states from the 2nd century BC to the 15th century AD. Even though the sea routes between Europe and Asia were established, caravan trade continued along the Silk Road until the 17th century and later. While commerce was the primary intention for the establishment of this intercontinental network, Silk Road played a significant role in the exchange of knowledge, culture, religion, and technology between the East and West. Various belief systems extended along the route such as Buddhism, Islam, Christianity,
Manichaeism, and Zoroastrianism. Algebra, astronomy, Arabic numerals, medical developments and techniques, architectural styles spread from East to West, while various construction techniques, seafaring methods, medicinal plants, and cotton cultivation spread from West to East.

URLhttp://www.mukogawa-u.ac.jp/~iasu2016/pdf/iaSU2016_proceedings_108.pdf