Limyra

The ancient site of Limyra lies 6 km inland from the sea. Limyra (gr. Λιμύρα) was a small city in Lycia, on the Limyrus River. It was a prosperous settlement, and one of the oldest cities in the region of Lycia.

Limyra
Limyra

Arykanda

Arykanda is an ancient city built on mountain terraces at an altitude of 1000 m. near the village of Aykiriçay. This beautiful and remote site is extensive, rising up several terraces built into the rock face.

Arykanda
Arykanda

Phaselis

The ancient site of Phaselis lies 58 km south of Antalya on an isthmus with three pleasant beaches. Phaselis is set in an attractive pine forest, within a national park, surrounded on three sides by the sea.

Phaselis
Phaselis

Olympos

The ancient site of Olympos lies 73 km southwest of Antalya and is an ancient Lycian-Roman town along the beach, named for nearby Mount Olympos and encompassed within the Olympos National Park.

Olympos
Olympos

Rhodiapolis

The ancient site of Rhodiapolis lies near the modern town of Kumluca. Rhodiapolis received its name from the Rhodians that colonised it. We learn of its name from Hekataios. Theopompos claimed it was named after Rhodos, the daughter of Mopsos. However, its name in Lycian is thought to have been Wedrei (Wedrennehi/Wedrenni). The name Wedrei is found together with that of Trbennimi on the Dynastic period coins of Lycia. This suggests that there existed a settlement here prior to the Rhodian colonisation.

Rhodiapolis
Rhodiapolis

Ancient houses and colonnaded streets in Side

In the period of Side's greatest prosperity, in the second century AD, two wide colonnaded streets led from the main gate to the city center. The road leading in the southern direction is not currently used and is overgrown by a long stretch of lush vegetation. The road leading to the west, to the city agora, still serves as a thoroughfare of the city. Along this street there are traces of ancient shops and residential buildings that give us an idea of ​​how people lived in Side during antiquity.

Colonnaded street in Side
Colonnaded street in Side

5 hidden archaeological treasures of Turkish Riviera

Summertime has just begun and the holiday season is coming. Every year hundreds of thousands of holidaymakers arrive to the Turkish Riviera, the coastal strip of Mediterranean region of Turkey between Antalya and Alanya. Most of them will spend their leisure time sunbathing, swimming and dancing in numerous nightclubs. Some of these holidaymakers, however, will decide to take a trip to some of the region's most famous archaeological sites. You have most probably already heard of, or even visited, such places as Side, Aspendos or Perge.

The aqueduct in Selinus
The aqueduct in Selinus

Monumental gate and Vespasian monument in Side

The monumental gate, situated next to the theater, led in Roman times to the center of Side. Even today, traffic to the historical part of the town passes this gate. An elegant building, adjacent to this gate and supported by the ramparts of the 4th century AD, was probably erected in honor of Emperor Vespasian.

The current height of the monumental gate is 13.5 meters, but in the ancient times the structure was much higher. The entablature above the gate once supported the statue representing, most probably, a quadriga or a two-wheeled wagon drawn by four horses.

Monumental gate and Vespasian monument in Side
Monumental gate and Vespasian monument in Side

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