Tripolis

The ruins of the ancient city of Tripolis are located barely 20 km north-west of the famous Pammukkale. The present condition of the site does not impose on the visitors the impressions accompanying them during the visit in the ancient city of Hierapolis. However, recent excavations in the area of Tripolis and new discoveries finding their way to the Turkish media, allow to believe that this site will soon be an important spot on the tourist map of the Western Turkey.

Colonnaded street in Tripolis, September 2013
Colonnaded street in Tripolis, September 2013

Saray-ı Cedid-i Amire - the Ottoman palace in Edirne

Despite the worldwide fame that was brought to Edirne in 2011 when the Selimiye mosque was inscribed to the UNESCO World Heritage List and the fact that Edirne used to be the Ottoman capital, not many tourists realise that it is possible to visit the remains of the palace built by the Ottoman sultans there. The justification of this grave oversight may be the poor preservation state of this structure. Nevertheless, it is worthwhile to go to the Sarayiçi island on the Tunca river in order to see the scant remains of this structure. The additional attraction for the undecided is the closeness of the modern stadium where the famous oil-wrestling competitions take place.

Saray-ı Cedid-i Amire gate
Saray-ı Cedid-i Amire gate

The exhibition 'Stories From the Hidden Harbor: Shipwrecks of Yenikapı' closes in one month

'Stories from The Hidden Harbor: Shipwrecks of Yenikapı' is a remarkable exhibition which is hosted by Istanbul Archaeology Museums. It started on the 25th of June 2013 and will close on the 25th of December 2013. This exhibition shows the finds from the Byzantine and Ottoman periods identified at Yenikapı as well as the finds from beneath the harbor floor from the Neolithic period [1].

Zeus Temple in Aizanoi

Archaeological sites in Turkey are frequently 'decorated' with the reconstructions of ancient structures that often simultaneously delight tourists and outrage historians. The Zeus Temple in Aizanoi is a rare example of an excellently preserved original ancient building. With an exception of three columns that were re-erected after the earthquake from 1970, this temple has remained in its splendid glory since the ancient times, untouched by modern construction teams.

Zeus Temple in Aizanoi
Zeus Temple in Aizanoi

Roman baths in Aizanoi

There are two locations found in Aizanoi where Roman baths were situated. The first one is next to the road that leads from the Zeus Temple to the complex of stadium-theatre and the second one - in the area of modern Çavdarhisar village.

Roan baths in Aizanoi
Roan baths in Aizanoi

Hellenistic and Roman monuments in Stratonicea

The Stratonicea bouleuterion, built in 129-130 BC, resembles stylistically the one from Miletus. The entrance is on the western side of the building and four rows of seats have been preserved. In the past some scholars identified it with the Serapis temple, but the inscriptions found in the bouleuterion as well as an edict by emperor Diocletian testify against this theory.

Bouleuterion in Stratonicea
Bouleuterion in Stratonicea

Cyzicus

Cyzicus ancient city had been founded by the settlers from Miletus and was one of the oldest Ionian colonies on the coast of the Sea of Marmara. Once a magnificient temple of Hadrian stood there which was perceived as one of the Seven Wonders of the World in the times of late Roman Empire. Now, the ruins of Cyzicus are rarely visited by tourists and the remains of ancient structures are heavily overgrown and inhabited mainly by bat colonies.

Cyzicus
Cyzicus

Daskyleion

The remains of Daskyleion, situated nearby the Manyas lake and Ergili village, are extremely interesting for historians because of their turbulent history. In this north-western Anatolian settlement the numerous traces of Persian rule were discovered, including the satrap's palace and the place of Zoroastrianism religious rituals.

Daskyleion
Daskyleion

Roman baths from Stratonicea will be excavated

The archaeologists under the leadership of dr Bilal Söğüt from Pamukkale University in Denizli are currently working in the area of Roman bath in ancient Stratonicea. The team of 100 workers will clear the remains of the baths complex that was built for women only. All together there are three bath complexes in Stratonicea as the recent research has confirmed.

Lagina

Nearby Yatağan, overshadowed by the thermal power plant, lie the ruins of Lagina ancient sanctuary. Their location, among the surroundings heavily damaged by industrial activities, paradoxically matches the characteristics of the goddess who used to be worshipped there. It was Hecate, the dark goddess of the underworld, of Anatolian origins.

Hecate temple in Lagina
Hecate temple in Lagina

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