Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

The Temple of Artemis at Ephesus was a great building belonging to the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Unfortunately, nowadays a visit to Ephesus Artemision brings a big disappointment, comparable to trying to see the Great Altar of Zeus in Pergamon. It is because a single column and a bit of rubble remained of the Temple of Artemis to our times.

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

Sarı Han Caravanserai

An impressive building of Yellow Caravanserai, referred to in Turkish as Sarı Han or Saru Han, stands on the outskirts of Avanos. Its name, as you might imagine, comes from the color of stone blocks that were used for its erection in 1249. Yellow Caravanserai owes its present appearance to a thorough renovation, carried out in 1991. Travelers visiting Cappadocia usually have the opportunity to visit this caravanserai, if they decide to participate in sema ceremony that is the show of famous whirling dervishes.

Sarı Han Caravanserai
Sarı Han Caravanserai

Şapinuwa

The discovery of the ruins of the Hittite city of Şapinuwa was a huge surprise for the researchers of this period of the history of Asia Minor. Although archaeological work has been conducted on this site since 1990, many of the issues associated with the importance and the role Şapinuwa played during the period of Hittite domination remain a mystery. The researchers conducting excavations in Şapinuwa claim that it was the second capital of the Hittites or the royal residence of the rulers of this country. The most valuable discovery made so far in Şapinuwa is a collection of over three thousand pieces of clay tablets from the second millennium BCE. Unfortunately, not all of them have already been read, and many researchers eagerly await the full publication of their contents.

Şapinuwa
Şapinuwa

Parion (Kemer)

The ruins of the ancient city of Parion are located on the territory of modern Turkish village of Kemer, in Çanakkale Province, on the coast of the Marmara Sea. The ruins are far from the beaten track, so it is difficult to reach them, and even find interesting information in a language other than Turkish is a challenge. Thanks to intensive archaeological excavations, conducted in Parion, crucial findings are made every year, shedding light on the history of the settlement.

Parion excavations
Parion excavations

Çorum Archaeology and Ethnography Museum

The building that hosts the Çorum Museum displays typical architectural features of the 19th century. It was initially built in 1914 as a hospital. Later on, it was used as the School of Agriculture, School of Medicine, School of Art, School of Trade, Machinery Academy and Atatürk High School. After a fire in 1988 had damaged the building, restoration work was initiated in 1989. On 11 March 2003, the building started to serve as the new Çorum Museum.

Çorum Archaeology and Ethnography Museum
Çorum Archaeology and Ethnography Museum

Panionium

Panionium (Panionion) was an Ionian sanctuary dedicated to Poseidon Helikonios, and, at the same time, the Ionian League meeting place. This unusual site was located on the northern slopes of Mount Mykale (tr. Samsun Dağı or Dilek Dağı), opposite the island of Samos, about 100 km south of Smyrna (now Izmir). Mykale Massif forms Dilek Peninsula, which is a part of the Aegean Sea coast of Asia Minor. On the southern side of the mountain, the Ionian city of Priene was situated. Its residents were responsible for the sanctuary of Panionium and for the organization of games (panegyris) called the Panionia.

Panionium
Panionium

Sarıkale in Hattusa

The great rock, known as Sarıkale i.e. the Yellow Fortress, is hard to miss in Hattusas. It is a 60-meter high rock with a characteristic shape where a fortress guarding the capital city was standing in the Hittite times. The was erected, most likely, at the turn of the 14th and the 13th centuries BCE. Some theories claim that Sarıkale served as a religious location, and more precisely - as a place of worship of the dead.

Sarıkale in Hattusa
Sarıkale in Hattusa

Royal Citadel in Hattusa

The Royal Citadel (tr. Kral Saray), also known as the Great Castle (tr. Büyükkale), was, as its name suggests, the seat of the Hittite kings. Because of its location, at the highest point of the Old Town, it offers stunning views of the whole area of Hattusa but also the valley in the north where the modern Turkish village of Boğazkale is situated.

Royal Citadel in Hattusa
Royal Citadel in Hattusa

Museum in Ürgüp

The museum in Ürgüp is one of the biggest disappointments that we experienced in Cappadocia. This tiny museum is neglected and underfunded. The prevailing atmosphere of perpetual boredom discourages the visitors from taking a closer look at the exhibits. We realize that most tourists do not come to Cappadocia because of the sudden desire to visit museums but to admire beautiful landscapes of the region. However, with such a significant tourist traffic, the lamentable state of this institution seems strange, just like in the case of Kayseri Museum. Why do local authorities not take advantage of the opportunity to attract the attention of visitors coming to Cappadocia and to interest them in the rich history of the region?

The relief of the archangel Gabriel. It once decorated a church in Mustafapaşa.
The relief of the archangel Gabriel. It once decorated a church in Mustafapaşa.

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