Welcome to TAN, Turkish Archaeological News, a website created with the aim of providing news about the latest archaeological discoveries in Turkey and neighbouring regions!

Mount Nemrut

Mount Nemrut, the monumental resting place of King Antiochus I Theos from the Kingdom of Commagene, is one of the most fascinating ancient places in Turkey. Although the country abounds in magnificent relics of antiquity, Mount Nemrut certainly deserves the place on the top ten list of the archaeological hits of Asia Minor. Moreover, the hierothesion of Antiochus is a sensational sight on a global scale. At the same time, it is an archaeological site that still holds many secrets. Until now, it has not been possible to determine with certainty what the artificial embankment on the peak of the mountain conceals. What's more, astronomy enthusiasts can try to solve the mystery of the famous "lion horoscope" placed on one of the bas-reliefs decorating the mountain. Finally, the huge sculptures on Mount Nemrut are a perfect illustration of religious syncretism and Antiochus' attempt to introduce a new state cult that combined Greek, Persian and Armenian influences.

West Terrace of Mount Nemrut
West Terrace of Mount Nemrut

January 2018 in Turkish archaeology

The beginning of 2018 brought new hopes for recovering Turkish travel industry as well as some fascinating archaeological discoveries, including ancient burial chambers, holy water springs and underground cities. A milestone found in the area of ancient Termessos has risen prospects of finding a yet unknown ancient city. Moreover, a breakthrough in our knowledge about the prehistory of Asia Minor is expected as the European Research Council has given Turkish scientists a €2.5 million grant for the DNA analysis of 1,500 people who lived in the Anatolian region during the Neolithic period.

Basilica Cistern in Istanbul
Basilica Cistern in Istanbul

Faint Whispers from the Oracle - new book about Didyma

Faint Whispers from the Oracle

Faint Whispers from the Oracle. The archaeological environment surrounding the Temple of Apollo at Didyma offers a unique insight into the remarkable Greco-Roman archaeology which surrounds the Temple of Apollo at Didyma, the second most important oracular sanctuary in antiquity. The author has expunged the stuffy and meticulous language of the academicians to breathe vibrancy into the narrative which brings to light the complexities of both the ancient world and the ongoing conundrums afflicting the archaeological site today. This e-book has been designed to assist those venturing to Didyma to be able to follow the fascinating archaeology encircling the Temple upon their mobile devices.

This unique book contains 70 photographs and three detailed plans - of the archaeological site in Didyma, the Sacred Way, and the newly discovered ancient theatre of Didyma. There is also a bibliography for those of the readers who would like to deepen their knowledge about the archaeological and historical context of Didyma.

Doğanbey

Many travellers certainly know the abandoned Greek village Kayaköy near Fethiye on the Lycian coast. Its ruined houses evoke the memories of ancient Greek inhabitants of Turkey. However, few people know that a very similar place exists on the Aegean coast, close to the renowned holiday resort of Kuşadası.

Doğanbey
Doğanbey

Ezine

Ezine is a small town located in the southern part of Çanakkale Province. Its location makes this sleepy little town an excellent base for tourists visiting the sights in the Biga Peninsula, i.e. in the ancient Troad region. The most famous product from the Ezine is the local cheese, called, of course, Ezine peyniri. It is made from cow, sheep, and goat milk, and the secret of its flavour lies apparently in the process of maturation in tin containers. This cheese can be purchased at many stores throughout the town. It's hard to miss the opportunity to buy this speciality, even if you are only passing through Ezine on the main road, as the adverts are visible everywhere.

Ezine
Ezine

Pages

Subscribe to Turkish Archaeological News RSS