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Çayönü archaeological site and Hilar Caves face oblivion

Hilar Caves
Hilar Caves

A Neolithic settlement of Çayönü is situated in Diyarbakır province of Turkey, nearby a small town of Ergani. It was inhabited from around 7200 to 6600 BC and first excavated between 1964 and 1978 by a team of archaeologists led by Robert John Braidwood. The second round of excavations was conducted from 1985 to 1991. The study of Çayönü revealed that the settlement covers the periods of the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A, the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B and the Pottery Neolithic. The area of the settlement consists of a mound which is 200 meters in diameter.

Neandria

Alexandria Troas was the ancient port city in the Troad, founded by Antigonus I Monophthalmus - one of the generals of Alexander the Great - as Antigoneia. After the death of Antigonus, another Macedonian commander - Lysimachus - controlled the Troad. The city was then renamed to Alexandria, in honor of the great Macedonian leader. Because there were many cities called Alexandria in those days, this particular Alexandria was given the term "Troas" or "from the Troad."

Neandria
Neandria

Byzantine church found under Lake İznik

Lake Iznik
Lake Iznik

In the end of January 2014 Turkish media informed about the discovery of a Byzantine church, hidden underneath the waters of Lake İznik in Bursa Province. The mysteries of this structure have slowly began to be unveiled by archaeologists and historians that joined their efforts to find out as much as possible about the building.

Volcanic geochronology evidences for the Çatalhöyük map

Çatalhöyük, May 2013
Çatalhöyük, May 2013

Researchers from the USA, New Zealand and Turkey have provided new evidence that supports the hypothesis suggesting that the mural excavated at the Neolithic Çatalhöyük is the oldest known map. Çatalhöyük site is located in Konya province, Turkey, and it provides a unique insight into daily life of humans in the period of transition from hunter-gatherer to settled societies. One of the interesting finds from this site is a mural from level VII, which has been described by its discoverer as depicting a volcanic eruption.

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