Temple of Augustus and Roma in Ankara

The temple of Augustus and Roma in Ankara was erected after the conquest of Central Anatolia by the Roman emperor Octavian Augustus in 25 BCE. The city, then known as Ancyra, became the capital of the newly formed Province of Galatia. After the death of Augustus in 14 CE, a copy of his autobiography entitled "Deeds of the Divine Augustus" was placed on the walls of the temple both in Latin and in Greek translation. There were many such copies the Roman Empire, but nowadays the inscription from Ankara, known as the Monumentum Ancyranum, is an almost complete preserved version of the text. This fact makes it a unique source of knowledge for researchers of this period of history.

Temple of Augustus and Roma in Ankara
Temple of Augustus and Roma in Ankara

Karatepe - Aslantaş

Karatepe-Aslantaş National Park is one of those wonderful places of a great historical importance in Turkey that are visited by very few travellers. Therefore they can be explored in thoughtful silence to appreciate the charm of the former Hittite citadel fully. It is picturesquely located on a forested hill, over an artificial reservoir formed by the Aslantaş Dam.

Karatepe - Aslantaş
Karatepe - Aslantaş

Alalakh

Alalakh, now known as Tell Atchana, is an archaeological site in the Hatay Province. During the Bronze Age, Alalakh was a city-state and the seat of kings who ruled the Amuq Plain. It is a broad valley crossed by Orontes River. Because of the river's periodical outflows, the valley is covered with a thick layer of fertile alluvial deposits. This situation has encouraged the development of intensive agriculture. The fertile Amuq Plain has been densely populated at least since the 7th millennium BCE. There are many traces of ancient settlements that attract archaeologists from all over the world. One of the most prominent of these sites is Tell Atchana, first explored in the 30's of the 20th century by the British expedition.

Alalakh
Alalakh

Tilmen Höyük

The archaeological site of Tilmen Höyük, located in the Gaziantep Province in southeastern Turkey, is an excellent example of a Bronze Age urban settlement. Even the travellers who are usually not much interested in history should be satisfied with a visit to Tilmen. It is picturesquely situated in the bend of Karasu River, among vast wetlands that are home to many species of birds. Tthe peaks of the Amanus and Kurt mountain ranges are visible far away, on the horizon. A walk on the mound is even more pleasant because of lush vegetation, including wild olive trees and oaks. Photography enthusiasts have the opportunity of capturing the species of local flora and fauna, including friendly crabs, in addition to taking photos of the ruins.

Tilmen Höyük
Tilmen Höyük

Kırkkaşık Bedesten in Tarsus

Kırkkaşık Bedesten, literally translated as the Bazaar of Forty Spoons, is a covered market in Tarsus. Its history is closely related to the Grand Mosque of Tarsus, standing next to it. The bedesten is not only a historical attraction to the tourists who visit Tarsus, but it also plays a commercial role as a famous shopping centre.

Kırkkaşık Bedesten in Tarsus
Kırkkaşık Bedesten in Tarsus

Grand Mosque of Tarsus

When visiting the city of Tarsus, it is worth to remember not only about the monuments of the ancient period and the times of early Christianity. The history of the Grand Mosque (tr. Ulu Cami) is a perfect illustration of the turbulent history of the town, where numerous cultures and religions influenced each other, sometimes in an unexpected way.

Grand Mosque of Tarsus
Grand Mosque of Tarsus

Yesemek

Yesemek quarry and workshop complex is truly a unique place on a global scale. In the old days, it served as a quarry and a workshop of monumental sculptures that decorated the Hittite sanctuaries in the south-eastern Anatolia. Today, it is the largest place of its kind, known to researchers of the Middle East. The travellers who arrive there can admire hundreds of Hittite sculptures in various stages of completion.

Yesemek
Yesemek

Cleopatra's Gate in Tarsus

Tarsus is a city with a very long history, and numerous famous individuals have strolled down its streets. The first meeting of Mark Antony and Cleopatra is undoubtedly one of the most colourful episodes in the history of Tarsus. It is often said that it took place at one of the massive gates of the city. This particular gate is now called the Cleopatra's Gate at the memory of that event.

Cleopatra's Gate in Tarsus
Cleopatra's Gate in Tarsus

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