Lion Gate in Hattusa

The capital of the Hittites - Hattusa - was surrounded by massive fortifications when the Hittite civilization had a status of the Near East superpower. The walls were erected using the natural shape of the terrain or completely changing it, depending on the architectural and strategic needs. At least six gates let people enter the interior of the city. The Lion Gate is the first one that can be seen when following the official sightseeing route around Hattusa.

Lion Gate in Hattusa
Lion Gate in Hattusa

King's Gate in Hattusa

The King's Gate (tr. Kral Kapısı) is situated in the south-eastern part of Hattusa city walls. It is worth the attention of visitors especially because of its excellent state of preservation. Its shape and size are similar to The Lion Gate in the south-western part of the fortifications.

King's Gate in Hattusa
King's Gate in Hattusa

Myus

When you visit the inconspicuous ruins located near Lake Bafa, you might it find hard to believe that Myus was a city-state in ancient times. It was a member of a powerful confederation of twelve Ionian colonies in Asia Minor. Similarly as in the case of Miletus or Priene, the history of Myus is intrinsically linked with the river Meander. For centuries, this river gradually silted up the large bay on the coast of which many Greek cities were located.

Myus
Myus

Kadıkalesi (Anaia)

Kadıkalesi is one of the biggest archaeological surprises in the vicinity of Kuşadası. It is a Byzantine castle, standing at the site identified with the Greek colony known as Anaia. Moreover, the hill bears the traces of human activity dating back to prehistoric times.

Kadıkalesi (Anaia)
Kadıkalesi (Anaia)

Heracleia by Latmus

Extensive ruins of Heracleia by Latmus are situated picturesquely on the shores of Lake Bafa, which is the remainder of the former Latmian Gulf. In ancient times, around this bay, many port cities were established, including Miletus, Priene, and Myus. Just as in their case, also the history of Heracleia is closely associated with the activity of Meander River. This river for centuries gradually silted up the bay, depriving nearby cities of the access to the Aegean Sea.

Heracleia by Latmus
Heracleia by Latmus

Ephesus

Situated in the Aegean region of Turkey, Ephesus is probably the best preserved ancient city in the Mediterranean. In ancient times, Ephesus was a bustling trading city and a center of worship of Cybele - the goddess of fertility. Archaeological excavations and maintenance works provide new information about the ancient city every year. Therefore, this is a place worth coming back again and again.

Library of Celsus in Ephesus
Library of Celsus in Ephesus

Terrace Houses in Ephesus

The Terrace Houses complex in Ephesus consists of luxurious residential villas, located on the northern slope of Bülbüldağı Hill, next to Curetes Street and opposite the Temple of Hadrian. So far, two housing complexes - Eastern and Western - have been excavated. They were built according to the Hippodamian plan where the roads transect each other at right angles. The excavation work of the Terrace Houses started in 1960. The restoration of the houses is an ongoing process and every year there is something new to admire there.

Terrace Houses in Ephesus
Terrace Houses in Ephesus

Ginolu Castle

Ginolu Castle is located on the shores of the Black Sea, in the western part of Çatalzeytin, in the Province of Kastamonu. According to archaeological and historical sources, it is estimated that the area was inhabited since the 5th century BC, but the date of the castle construction has not been determined unequivocally. The Turkish researcher, Erdal Eser, explains that "The negative topographical conditions and the maritime transportation which has been activated since the early periods are the important reasons for the lack of information in our research." [see Bibliography section below]

Ginolu Castle
Ginolu Castle

Visiting museums and archaeological sites in Turkey - how to check opening times and ticket prices?

Travelers interested in visiting archaeological sites and museums in Turkey frequently face a very basic question: is this particular site currently available for visitors? And if so, how much does the ticket cost? Naturally, it is possible to check this out in guidebooks or on various websites, Turkish Archaeological News portal included. However, the opening hours and ticket prices are changed regularly, and some venues are temporarily closed because of renovation, restoration, or other reasons.

Pamukkale ticket booth
Pamukkale ticket booth

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