The “Temple of Hadrian” on Curetes Street in Ephesus: new research into its building history

TitleThe “Temple of Hadrian” on Curetes Street in Ephesus: new research into its building history
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsQuatember U
JournalJournal of Roman Archaeology
Volume23
Pagination376–394
KeywordsEphesus, Hadrian, temple
Abstract

The building commonly known as the Temple of Hadrian is one the best-known buildings of Roman Ephesus (fig. 1), occupying a prominent location in the W section of Curetes Street, one of the chief thoroughfares of the Roman city. The street lies in the valley between the two hills that shape the urban layout, the Panayırdağ to the north and the Bülbüldağ to the south. Discovered in 1956 and re-erected during the following two years, the “Temple of Hadrian” has never been systematically analyzed, and scholars have been unable to establish its chronology, function, and definitive reconstruction. A new project is underway at the Austrian Archaeological Institute to address these questions and the present article presents preliminary results on the building phases and history of
the structure.