April 2024 in Turkish archaeology

April 2024 saw the works nearing completion at ancient lighthouse of Patara, once the capital of the Lycian League. Meanwhile, during the archaeological excavations in Hıdırlık Tower, one of the historical symbols of Antalya, the famous holiday resort in the south of Turkey, an 800-metre-long colonnaded street of the Roman period was discovered. Finally, a new chapter in the Hittite world was revealed by painted hieroglyphs discovered in the Hattusa Yerkapı tunnel.

Hattusa Yerkapı tunnel
Hattusa Yerkapı tunnel

Gate of Mazaeus and Mithridates in Ephesus

The Commercial Agora had three main gates, enabling access from the north onto Harbour Street, the south-east, and the west. The most impressive and best-preserved of these gates is the so-called Gate of Mazaeus and Mithridates on the south-eastern side, very close to the Celsus Library. This monument is also the only large-scale structure of the Augustan building programme that survived the earthquake of 23 CE.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Ephesus: "The Secrets of Ephesus".

Gate of Mazaeus and Mithridates in Ephesus
Gate of Mazaeus and Mithridates in Ephesus

Great Theatre in Ephesus

The great theater of Ephesus is a splendidly preserved and very impressive building. This structure, built of marble, has a width of 145 meters, and its audience once reached up to 30 meters. In its heyday, it could accommodate up to 24,000 spectators.

Great Theatre in Ephesus
Great Theatre in Ephesus

Magnesian Gate Area in Ephesus

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Ephesus: "The Secrets of Ephesus".

The guided tours of Ephesus usually finish with the visit to the area of the State Agora and the monuments surrounding it. However, after leaving the archaeological site via the Southern Entrance, it is worthwhile to stay here for a moment or two, to see some ancient buildings situated outside the official sightseeing paths.

Magnesian Gate in Ephesus
Magnesian Gate in Ephesus

March 2024 in Turkish archaeology

March 2024 brought many fascinating archaeological discoveries in the area of Turkey. Among the most sensational ones, the researchers announced that they had discovered about 8,600-year-old bread at Çatalhöyük, a Neolithic settlement in central Turkey. Moreover, a 2700-year-old children's cemetery was discovered during ongoing excavations in the ancient city of Tenedos in Bozcaada island. Finally, the archaeologists unearthed the earliest known evidence of body perforation in skeletons dating back 11,000 years at the Boncuklu Tarla excavation site in southeastern Turkey.

Çatalhöyük excavations
Çatalhöyük excavations

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