Tripolis

The ruins of the ancient city of Tripolis are located barely 20 km north-west of the famous Pamukkale. The present condition of the site does not impose on the visitors the impressions accompanying them during the visit in the ancient city of Hierapolis. However, recent excavations in the area of Tripolis and new discoveries finding their way to the Turkish media, allow to believe that this site will soon be an important spot on the tourist map of the Western Turkey.

Colonnaded street in Tripolis, September 2013
Colonnaded street in Tripolis, September 2013

The exhibition 'Stories From the Hidden Harbor: Shipwrecks of Yenikapı' closes in one month

'Stories from The Hidden Harbor: Shipwrecks of Yenikapı' is a remarkable exhibition which is hosted by Istanbul Archaeology Museums. It started on the 25th of June 2013 and will close on the 25th of December 2013. This exhibition shows the finds from the Byzantine and Ottoman periods identified at Yenikapı as well as the finds from beneath the harbor floor from the Neolithic period [1].

Zeus Temple in Aizanoi

Archaeological sites in Turkey are frequently 'decorated' with the reconstructions of ancient structures that often simultaneously delight tourists and outrage historians. The Zeus Temple in Aizanoi is a rare example of an excellently preserved original ancient building. With an exception of three columns that were re-erected after the earthquake from 1970, this temple has remained in its splendid glory since the ancient times, untouched by modern construction teams.

Zeus Temple in Aizanoi
Zeus Temple in Aizanoi

Roman baths in Aizanoi

There are two locations found in Aizanoi where Roman baths were situated. The first one is next to the road that leads from the Zeus Temple to the complex of stadium-theatre and the second one - in the area of modern Çavdarhisar village.

Roan baths in Aizanoi
Roan baths in Aizanoi

Hellenistic and Roman monuments in Stratonicea

The Stratonicea bouleuterion, built in 129-130 BC, resembles stylistically the one from Miletus. The entrance is on the western side of the building and four rows of seats have been preserved. In the past some scholars identified it with the Serapis temple, but the inscriptions found in the bouleuterion as well as an edict by emperor Diocletian testify against this theory.

Bouleuterion in Stratonicea
Bouleuterion in Stratonicea

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