Alytarches' Stoa in Ephesus

The south-western section of Curetes Street in Ephesus finished with the so-called Alytarches' Stoa, to the east of the Hellenistic Fountain. It was a 53-meter-long structure, 4 to 5 meters deep, and divided into two sections because of the variance in the ground level.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Ephesus: "The Secrets of Ephesus".

Alytarches' Stoa in Ephesus
Alytarches' Stoa in Ephesus

August 2021 in Turkish archaeology

August of 2021 saw numerous archaeological excavations carried out in the area of Turkey, including the projects in Antandros, Comana Pontica, Alacahöyük, Pompeiopolis, and Ani. Moreover, the iconic Ephesus theatre reopened its doors for art-lovers following a three-year break due to restoration works.

The city gate and fortifications of Ani
The city gate and fortifications of Ani

Column of Marcian

The Column of Marcian is an honorary monument erected in Constantinople by the city prefect (praefectus urbi) Tatianus in honour of the Eastern Roman Emperor Marcian, who reigned in the years 450–457. Since no documents from this period that would describe this column have survived, everything that is known about it must be deduced from its location, style of execution, and the dedicatory inscription.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Istanbul: "Byzantine Secrets of Istanbul".

Column of Marcian
Column of Marcian

Hall of Verulanus and Harbour Baths of Ephesus

The main square of the harbour district was the so-called Hall of Verulanus. This spacious square, measuring 200 by 240 meters, used to be the largest of the sports facilities situated along Harbour Street. Its name comes from the founder, Verulanus, who was the chief priest of Asia during the reign of Emperor Hadrian. He ordered paving and tiling of the greater of the palestrae of the Harbour Baths with marble slabs in 13 different shades. These panels have not been preserved to our times, but their existence is evidenced by the holes in the walls, where the panels were attached. This arcaded courtyard served as training grounds of the athletes. Called xystos in antiquity, the court was surrounded by a three-aisled colonnade with its broad middle aisle serving as a running track. The best opportunity to glimpse the ruined Hall of Verulanus is to look at its eastern corner, recently uncovered by the archaeologists next to the Church of Mary.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Ephesus: "The Secrets of Ephesus".

Bronze Statue of an Athlete
Bronze Statue of an Athlete

July 2021 in Turkish archaeology

The biggest news of July 2021 was the inscription of Arslantepe Mound near Malatya into UNESCO's World Heritage List. This event broke the unlucky trend as after Göbekli Tepe became the World Heritage Site in 2018 no other archaeological sites from the area of Turkey were granted this privilege for three years. In other news, Turkey reopened Sümela Monastery in the Black Sea region to visitors after five years of restoration. Moreover, the archaeologists discovered a 1000-year-old human skeleton in Perre and the monumental entrance gate of the Zeus Temple's sanctuary in the ancient city of Aizanoi.

Turkish Archaeological News collects the most important, interesting and inspiring news from Turkish excavation sites. Here's the review for July 2021. Have we missed anything? Let us know by using Contact tab!

The famous first swords dated to the Early Bronze Age (33rd to 31st centuries BCE) found at Arslantepe by Marcella Frangipane of Rome University
The famous first swords dated to the Early Bronze Age (33rd to 31st centuries BCE) found at Arslantepe by Marcella Frangipane of Rome University

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