Grotto of the Seven Sleepers in Ephesus

If you find yourself in the vicinity of Ephesus, you should find the ruins of the Grotto of the Seven Sleepers (tr. Yedi Uyuyanlar), located nearby. It is a Byzantine necropolis where dozens of rock-cut tombs can be seen. The grotto is one of the several places related to the legend of a group of youths who hid inside a cave and years after woke up to find the world changed. This legend has two versions, Christian, and Islamic.

Grotto of the Seven Sleepers in Ephesus
Grotto of the Seven Sleepers in Ephesus

Kızılhisar Castle

Kızılhisar Castle (Red Fortress), also known as Keçi Kalesi or Goat Castle, is situated on Alamandağ Hill, in ancient times known as Gallesion. This hill stands in the vicinity of the town Belevi near Selçuk and is clearly visible from the İzmir-Aydın highway.

Kızılhisar Castle
Kızılhisar Castle

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

The Temple of Artemis at Ephesus was a great building belonging to the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Unfortunately, nowadays a visit to Ephesus Artemision brings a big disappointment, comparable to trying to see the Great Altar of Zeus in Pergamon. It is because a single column and a bit of rubble remained of the Temple of Artemis to our times.

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

Sarı Han Caravanserai

An impressive building of Yellow Caravanserai, referred to in Turkish as Sarı Han or Saru Han, stands on the outskirts of Avanos. Its name, as you might imagine, comes from the color of stone blocks that were used for its erection in 1249. Yellow Caravanserai owes its present appearance to a thorough renovation, carried out in 1991. Travelers visiting Cappadocia usually have the opportunity to visit this caravanserai, if they decide to participate in sema ceremony that is the show of famous whirling dervishes.

Sarı Han Caravanserai
Sarı Han Caravanserai

Şapinuwa

The discovery of the ruins of the Hittite city of Şapinuwa was a huge surprise for the researchers of this period of the history of Asia Minor. Although archaeological work has been conducted on this site since 1990, many of the issues associated with the importance and the role Şapinuwa played during the period of Hittite domination remain a mystery. The researchers conducting excavations in Şapinuwa claim that it was the second capital of the Hittites or the royal residence of the rulers of this country. The most valuable discovery made so far in Şapinuwa is a collection of over three thousand pieces of clay tablets from the second millennium BCE. Unfortunately, not all of them have already been read, and many researchers eagerly await the full publication of their contents.

Şapinuwa
Şapinuwa

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