The Grand Temple and the Lower City in Hattusa

The part of Hattusa located at the foot of the Royal Citadel (tr. Büyükkale) is known as the Lower City (tr. Aşağı Şehir). It is also the first stopover on the designated Hattusa sightseeing trail. In this area, it is possible to see the ruins of the Grand Temple, the remains of an Assyrian trade colony, and the traces of residential houses and offices.

The Lion Tub, outside the Grand Temple in Hattusa
The Lion Tub, outside the Grand Temple in Hattusa

Lion Gate in Hattusa

The capital of the Hittites - Hattusa - was surrounded by massive fortifications when the Hittite civilization had a status of the Near East superpower. The walls were erected using the natural shape of the terrain or completely changing it, depending on the architectural and strategic needs. At least six gates let people enter the interior of the city. The Lion Gate is the first one that can be seen when following the official sightseeing route around Hattusa.

Lion Gate in Hattusa
Lion Gate in Hattusa

King's Gate in Hattusa

The King's Gate (tr. Kral Kapısı) is situated in the south-eastern part of Hattusa city walls. It is worth the attention of visitors especially because of its excellent state of preservation. Its shape and size are similar to The Lion Gate in the south-western part of the fortifications.

King's Gate in Hattusa
King's Gate in Hattusa

Myus

When you visit the inconspicuous ruins located near Lake Bafa, you might it find hard to believe that Myus was a city-state in ancient times. It was a member of a powerful confederation of twelve Ionian colonies in Asia Minor. Similarly as in the case of Miletus or Priene, the history of Myus is intrinsically linked with the river Meander. For centuries, this river gradually silted up the large bay on the coast of which many Greek cities were located.

Myus
Myus

Kadıkalesi (Anaia)

Kadıkalesi is one of the biggest archaeological surprises in the vicinity of Kuşadası. It is a Byzantine castle, standing at the site identified with the Greek colony known as Anaia. Moreover, the hill bears the traces of human activity dating back to prehistoric times.

Kadıkalesi (Anaia)
Kadıkalesi (Anaia)

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