Pithos Garden of Troy

A pithos is a thick-walled, bulbous storage jar made of clay, sometimes higher than a standing person. Pithoi were widely used in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East regions, mainly for the storage and transportation of goods, but sometimes also as coffins. These storage containers were typically found half-buried in the floors of pantries and warehouses, where olive oil, water, honey, salt, and cereals were kept. The pithoi guaranteed the best conditions for these foodstuffs, keeping them cool and protected against rodents. They could also be sealed and stamped to mark their owners. If used for transportation, they were equipped with large handles in the upper part, through which the ropes were pulled. The pithoi shown in the exhibition were found at Troy, for instance in Megaron VI.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Troy "The Secrets of Troy (TAN Travel Guide)".

Pithos Garden of Troy
Pithos Garden of Troy

The complex riddle of a road forever closed

Those of you who follow my articles, or have purchased my book, shall be acutely aware of my desire to once more open the Sacred Road at its conclusion at the Temple of Apollo in Didyma. It is a forlorn sight to be witness to countless foreign visitors peering through the metal railings, or over the stone wall, which impedes their imaginations. Some travel from the other side of the globe to see the ancient treasures of Turkey, but their efforts to experience this particularly interesting site is sadly and mysteriously out of bounds. It rather posits the question, “Why? For what earthly reason?”

Text by Glenn Maffia

Sacred Road in Didyma
Sacred Road in Didyma

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Trojan Horse of Troy

The tale of the Trojan Horse is one of the most frequently told stories from the mythical Trojan War. It tells about the trick employed by the Greeks who were tired of besieging Troy for a decade. Cunning Odysseus, the legendary king of Ithaca, suggested building an enormous wooden horse. When the construction was ready, the elite of warriors hid inside, while the remaining Greeks pretended to sail away, bored of the war. The jubilant Trojans wheeled the horse into the city and started the celebrations. Undercover of the night, the Greeks sneaked out of the horse, opened the gates of Troy, and the Greek army entered the city, destroyed it, and killed its inhabitants.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Troy "The Secrets of Troy (TAN Travel Guide)".

Trojan Horse of Troy
Trojan Horse of Troy

February 2020 in Turkish archaeology

February 2020 was a slow month for the archaeologists working in the area of Turkey. Perhaps the most thrilling news was the discovery announced by the archaeologists from the Oriental Institute in Chicago. They have discovered a lost ancient kingdom dating to 1400 BCE to 600 BCE which may have defeated Phrygia, the kingdom ruled by King Midas, in battle. Other projects concerned the renovations and reconstructions, for instance within a project titled the Roman Theater and Archaeology Park in Ankara. According to a written statement made by the municipality, works have been initiated to unearth the Roman Theater, which is one of the historical heritages in the Turkish capital.

Roman theatre of Ankara
Roman theatre of Ankara

Tourist visas no longer required for the citizens of 6 European countries!

On the 20th of February 2020, the spokesperson of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Mr Hami Aksoy, revealed that the Turkish authorities have decided to provide visa exemption to the citizens of six European countries: Austria, Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain, Poland, and the United Kingdom. This exemption will be valid starting from the 2nd of March 2020. It offers 90 days of visiting and travelling around Turkey without the necessity of purchasing a tourist visa within the period of 180 days. This step is aimed at increasing the tourism potential of Turkey and developing its commercial and cultural relations with Europe. This news is based on the information published on the official website of the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Traditional Turkish tourist visas stamped in a passport
Traditional Turkish tourist visas stamped in a passport

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