Cooperation with Balkan History Association

Cooperation with Balkan History Association
We are happy to announce that Turkish Archaeological News has started the cooperation with the Balkan History Association (BHA). We intend to promote the knowledge concerning the archaeology and history of the Balkans and Anatolia, to increase the awareness of their significance for the European culture.

The Balkan History Association (BHA) is a non-profit, apolitical, independent organization that aims to develop and promote at both national and international levels the interdisciplinary and comparative study of the Balkan region, and, more generally, of South-East Europe. Their activities include the organization of both academic events—conferences and lecture series—and social meetings, the latter targeting a non-specialized, general audience. The information related to these, as well as any research output generated on these occasions, are advertised and published primarily through their website, or the associated Hiperboreea Journal.

Identifying priorities

Text and photos by Glenn Maffia

It has been for well over a decade that the archaeological team, under the supervision of Professor Helga Bumke, has not only been uncovering the impressive finds within the vicinity of the Temple of Apollo in Didim, but also more arguably significant the continued ‘site management’ of the archaeological treasure.

The new building being erected in the 'protected area' of Didyma
The new building being erected in the 'protected area' of Didyma

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Apollo’s Sacred Spring Bursts Forth

Text and photos by Glenn Maffia

An exciting new development on the flooding of the southeast corner of the Temple’s precinct in Didim unfolded during late August and early September. I had spent many hours wandering around the site taking numerous photographs and obtaining measurements of the depth of the water. These were then relayed to my European contacts, which in turn were passed by them to specialists in the disciplines of geoarchaeology and hydrogeology. It wasn’t long before I received an answer which set me aflame with imagination and sheer delight.

Archaic terrace wall threatened by the reopened water course
Archaic terrace wall threatened by the reopened water course

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August 2018 in Turkish archaeology

August 2018 brought an impressive number of archaeological discoveries in the area of Turkey. Among the most notable ones were: the Hellenistic tombs in Euromos, the skull bearing the traces of surgery from Aşıklı Mound in Cappadocia, and the remains of a Roman-era military observation tower in Adıyaman province. Moreover, the amphitheatre of ancient Pergamon was announced to be unearthed, and Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality revealed the plans for the restoration of Boukoleon Palace.

Temple of Zeus in Euromos
Temple of Zeus in Euromos

An Aquatic Dilemma

Text and photos by Glenn Maffia

From high expectations, my dreams fell upon that bleak reality that archaeology does not always deliver the promises formulated within the imagination. I guess that is just the ground we are working on, where disappointments are required to savour that sweetness that comes with an exhilarating find. And to be fair, here in Didim the archaeologists have been unearthing those exciting finds in abundance over the past decade. Snippets of information can also be gleaned from an anti-climax, which adds breadth to the reconstruction which is being attempted.

Swamp in the SE corner of the Temple of Apollo, Didim
Swamp in the SE corner of the Temple of Apollo, Didim

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