Theodosius (Şerefiye) Cistern

It might seem that everything erected in Constantinople in the 5th and the 6th centuries was of colossal proportions: mainly regarding its public buildings and fortifications, but also the water supply system. The city, founded in the prominent and admirable location and surrounded by water lacked one crucial resource - a local supply of fresh water. Wells and small water sources at first met this need, but soon they could not meet the growing needs of the city's population.

Theodosius Cistern
Theodosius Cistern

Bostancıbaşı Bridge

It may seem that a city as rich in monuments as Istanbul stone bridges erected in Ottoman times should abound. Meanwhile, it turns out that it is very difficult to find examples of such Ottoman bridges near the historical centre of the city, as in fact, only one such structure has survived. This is the Bostancıbaşı Bridge, located in the Asian part of the city, in the Bostancı neighbourhood of the Kadıköy district.

Bostancıbaşı Bridge
Bostancıbaşı Bridge

Turkish Museums Videos - visiting archaeological sites from home

In these times, difficult for many of us, every initiative that enables visiting or revisiting museums and archaeological sites is of great importance and should be promoted. In the previous post devoted to this subject, we have shown you the possibility of the Virtual Tours of the Turkish Museums. Today, we want to invite you to watch the series of documentaries prepared by the Turkish Museums Channel. The first series is Excavation Sites in 5 Questions. In these films, the most famous and important archaeological sites located in Turkey are presented by the scholars who are the heads of the excavations. The films are either in English or have English subtitles.

Theatre of the Asclepieion in Pergamon
Theatre of the Asclepieion in Pergamon

Why does the Sacred Road in Didyma remain in Glorious Isolation?

My feelings are probably dismissive of the gravity of this pandemic we continue to ease free from, though I certainly have sorely missed my usual visits to the Temple of Apollo. A small window of opportunity offered itself recently and was hungrily devoured. Nothing much has changed upon the archaeological site; the columns still stand proud as sentinels, the marble continues to dazzle beneath a sun-filled sky, the groundwater steadily dribbles into the southeast section, the reeds growing in abundance, and the Sacred Road remains firmly shut to any inquisitive mind.

Text by Glenn Maffia

Roman Baths in Didyma
Roman Baths in Didyma

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April 2020 in Turkish archaeology

April 2020 was another quiet month in the archaeological world, but some important discoveries were made and published, anyway. Possibly the biggest one was made by Israeli archaeologists found a hidden pattern at Göbekli Tepe - an equilateral triangle, underlying the entire architectural plan of the complex. Moreover, five new entries of the sites from Turkey were made into UNESCO Tentative List, for better or worse, as it has been demonstrated in our publication. Meanwhile, one of the most precious historical heritage sites in the country - Hasankeyf - continued to disappear under the waters of Tigris River. The archaeologist went literally underground in Safranbolu and Kayseri where underground tunnels and rooms had been found. Finally, a rather sensational discovery was made in the Ottoman archives, revealing the evidence of the first person ever killed by a meteorite.

Göbekli Tepe
Göbekli Tepe

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