Ancient theatre of Ankara

The connoisseurs of ancient monuments that can be found in such abundance in Turkey may still be surprised by the fact that in the very centre of the historic district of Ankara stands a ruined ancient theatre. Just a few months ago, in the summer of 2018, this structure was almost completely forgotten and abandoned, even by the authorities of the Turkish capital. Only a few researchers of the ancient history of Ankara and a group of local drink enthusiasts remembered about this modest building. Fortunately, in autumn 2018, the first steps were taken to protect the monument, and this article may further contribute to the dissemination of information about it.

Ancient theatre of Ankara
Ancient theatre of Ankara

Roman Baths in Ankara

Many times, during the discussions held among the people travelling around Turkey, I heard that there was nothing interesting to see in Ankara, especially when it comes to ancient ruins. It always seemed very suspicious, because the capital of Turkey, centrally located in Anatolia, has a long and turbulent history. Therefore, surely some traces of its past must have survived. For a long time I have known the magnificent Museum of Anatolian Civilizations and the Atatürk Mausoleum, and a few years ago I was also able to visit the temple of the goddess Roma and Emperor Augustus. However, in 2018, we set out on a mission to find less-known ancient gems, preserved in Ankara. One of them is the ruined baths from the Roman period, commonly referred to as the Baths of Caracalla. Currently, its grounds are open to public as Roma Hamamı Açik Hava Müzesi.

Roman Baths in Ankara
Roman Baths in Ankara

October 2018 in Turkish archaeology

The most significant event of October 2018 was the grand opening of the Troy Museum. Moreover, fascinating finds were discovered in Istanbul's landmark Haydarpaşa Train Station excavations, including a functioning fountain from the Byzantine era. Finally, the copy of the statue of the Greek god of the underworld, Hades and his dog, Cerberus, is now decorating the Plutonium in Hierapolis, while the original can be seen in the local museum.

Istanbul's landmark Haydarpaşa Train Station
Istanbul's landmark Haydarpaşa Train Station

September 2018 in Turkish archaeology

September 2018 brought us news about many restoration projects carried out in the area of Turkey. Among the most notable renovations, one should mention the Bodrum Castle and Topkapı Palace. Moreover, an exciting archaeological discovery was reported this month, about a 2,500-year old Persian palace at the Oluz Mound. Finally, we learned more about Lydian eating habits, because of the excavations in the ancient city of Daskyleion.

Daskyleion archaeological site
Daskyleion archaeological site

Cooperation with Balkan History Association

Cooperation with Balkan History Association
We are happy to announce that Turkish Archaeological News has started the cooperation with the Balkan History Association (BHA). We intend to promote the knowledge concerning the archaeology and history of the Balkans and Anatolia, to increase the awareness of their significance for the European culture.

The Balkan History Association (BHA) is a non-profit, apolitical, independent organization that aims to develop and promote at both national and international levels the interdisciplinary and comparative study of the Balkan region, and, more generally, of South-East Europe. Their activities include the organization of both academic events—conferences and lecture series—and social meetings, the latter targeting a non-specialized, general audience. The information related to these, as well as any research output generated on these occasions, are advertised and published primarily through their website, or the associated Hiperboreea Journal.

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