Hellenistic Heroon in Ephesus

The visitors starting their walk down Curetes Street from the Triodos Square encounter a group of buildings lining the street to the south. The proximity to the so-called Hadrian's Gate and the monumental staircase that possibly was the Altar of Artemis signifies their importance. This group consists of three structures, from the west to the east: the Hellenistic Heroon, the Octagon, and the Hexagon. In their background, there is the so-called Terrace House II, the built-up residential area on the northern slope of Bülbüldağ Hill.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Ephesus: "The Secrets of Ephesus".

Hellenistic Heroon in Ephesus
Hellenistic Heroon in Ephesus

August 2020 in Turkish archaeology

August of 2020 brought the conversion of yet another museum (and previously a historical Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora) into a mosque in Turkey's biggest city, Istanbul. The archaeological excavations revealed a Byzantine granary in the ancient city of Amorium and a statue in Perge, believed to have belonged to a female benefactor from one of the aristocratic families of this ancient city. Moreover, the excavation teams reached the inner walls of a memorial tomb of the ancient Greek didactic poet Aratus in Soli (Pompeiopolis) and a Roman bathhouse and gymnasium in Smyrna.

Mosaic of the enrollment for taxation before Governor Quirinius in the former Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora
Mosaic of the enrollment for taxation before Governor Quirinius in the former Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora

Manor House of Troy II

This site consists of three parallel longhouses of the megaron type, dating back to the period of 2550 BC-2300 BCE. The fortifications protected these manor houses, but there was also a lower city outside the walls. Troy II consisted of seven layers of settlement, lying one on the other. In comparison to Troy I, Troy II was an extensive settlement, and the inhabitants of the upper city enjoyed many luxuries, such as silver, gold, and amber jewellery, found during the excavations of Schliemann. They also knew how to use a potter's wheel to produce beautifully decorated ceramics.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Troy "The Secrets of Troy (TAN Travel Guide)".

Manor House of Troy II
Manor House of Troy II

Commercial Agora in Ephesus

The Commercial (Lower) Agora of Ephesus was linked to the harbour by the Arcadiane, and stood close to its junction with the Marble Street, just to the south-west of the theatre. With an almost square plan, the Tetragonos Agora - whose ancient name, meaning the Square Market, has been confirmed by the inscriptions - was built for commercial purposes. It had impressive dimensions as its sides were 111 meters long. The Commercial Agora had three main gates, enabling access from the north onto Harbour Street, the south-east, and the west. The most impressive and best-preserved of these gates is the so-called Gate of Mazaeus and Mithridates on the south-eastern side, very close to the Celsus Library.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Ephesus: "The Secrets of Ephesus".

Commercial Agora in Ephesus
Commercial Agora in Ephesus

Fortification Walls of Troy I

The name of this stop - Troy I - means that you are now standing in the place where the oldest traces of human settlement within the Hisarlık Mound have been found. The history of the city dates back to the Early Bronze Age, i.e. around the year 3000 BCE, when the first settlement was established here. It was a small village, built on terraces of the hill, and consisting of 20 tiny rectangular houses. They were erected from interconnected blocks of stone and bricks.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Troy "The Secrets of Troy (TAN Travel Guide)".

Fortification Walls of Troy I
Fortification Walls of Troy I

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