Beylerbeyi Suleyman Pasha Mosque in Edirne

Much to the astonishment of the travellers who arrive to the city, Edirne has it all - historical mosques, baths, bridges, and museums. There is even Suleymaniye Mosque in the town, but it cannot match the splendour of the mosque bearing the same name erected by Sinan in Istanbul. Actually, the Suleymaniye Mosque in Edirne is a very modest structure, erected not on the orders of the sultan but one of the local governors.

Beylerbeyi Suleyman Pasha Mosque in Edirne during the renovation in 2013
Beylerbeyi Suleyman Pasha Mosque in Edirne during the renovation in 2013

January 2021 in Turkish archaeology

January 2021 brought to light the remains of the Aphrodite Temple in the Urla-Çeşme peninsula while a statuette of Asclepius and a bust of Serapis were unearthed in Kibyra. Moreover, memorial tombs of Seljuk sultans went under restoration in Konya and the sensational discovery was made in Diyarbakır where the graves of the Seljuk Sultan Kılıç Arslan I and his daughter Saide Hatun were uncovered.

Archaeological site of Kibyra
Archaeological site of Kibyra

Trajan's Nymphaeum in Ephesus

The look at the north-eastern side of the Curetes Street offers us a glimpse into the secrets of water supply to Ephesus as in this part of the city numerous monuments dedicated to this function were erected. The first one of them, as one walks down the street, is the Trajan's Nymphaeum. It has the shape of a pool surrounded on three sides by a two-storey structure. Like Rome, also ancient Ephesus was a city of fountains. Nowadays, with the running water readily available in our kitchens and bathrooms, we frequently underestimate the function of public fountains, treating them as a purely decorative element of the cityscape. However, in ancient cities of the Roman era, the majority of households had to draw drinking water from such fountains, and every day citizens, servants, and slaves rushed with vessels and buckets to fill them at the public fountains. These structures varied from simple ones to the elaborate monuments paid for by wealthy sponsors to commemorate their names or pay respects to the rulers of the Empire.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Ephesus: "The Secrets of Ephesus".

Trajan's Nymphaeum in Ephesus
Trajan's Nymphaeum in Ephesus

Water Cave of Wilusa

Water Cave of Wilusa is an artificial cave, not a work of nature. A 160-meter-long corridor was cut in the rock, heading eastward. It is connected to the surface by four vertical shafts with a height of up to 17 meters. The corridor was made in the third millennium BCE. It means that in the heyday of Troy VI, the cave had already been in use for a thousand years.

This text is a fragment of a guidebook to Troy "The Secrets of Troy (TAN Travel Guide)".

Water Cave of Wilusa
Water Cave of Wilusa

Archaeology in Turkey - 2020 in review

2020 was the year lived under the shadow of the world pandemic and many major plans failed to come into fruition. The same can be said about the situation in Turkish archaeology and travel industry. While some of the excavation projects were continued, others came to a halt as the foreign archaeological teams did not manage to arrive to Turkey. This was the situation, for instance, in Didyma and Ephesus.

2020 was the year of Patara archaeological site, photo (c) Michel Gybels
2020 was the year of Patara archaeological site, photo (c) Michel Gybels

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